how to knit cable trim edge

 

I have been working on Mothers Day pattern lately (besides some big orders that I have been making). It is going to be a triangle shawl (Edit: no it wasn’t – take a look how it turned out), but I have only border so far.

I am happy what I have accomplished, so I’m sharing this pattern for knit cable edging with you. Hope you like it.

 

 

 

Note! All right side (RS) rows start with knit stitch. All wrong side (WS) rows start with slip stitch purl wise.

knit cable and lace edging

 

Abbrevitaions:

  • k – knit
  • YO – yarn over
  • ssk – slip, slip, knit
  • p – purl
  • k2tog – knit two together
  • k3tog – knit three together
  • 4/4 LC – 4 stitches on cable needle, hold in front, k next 4 stitches and then k the ones on cable needle

 

 

Cast on 27 stitches.

Row 1(RS): k13, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, k8;
Row 2 (this and all the wrong side rows): p to last three stitches, k last 3 stitches;
Row 3: k14, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, k8;
Row 5: k15, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, 4/4 LC (4 stitches on cable needle, hold in front, k next 4 stitches and then k the ones on cable needle);
Row 7: k16, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, k8;
Row 9: k17, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, k8;
Row 11: k18, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, k8;
Row 13: k19, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, 4/4 LC;
Row 15: k20, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, k8;
Row 17: k21, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, k8;
Row 19: k22, (YO, ssk) 3 times, YO, k8;
Row 21: k22, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, YO, k3tog, 4/4 LC;
Row 23: k21,YO, k3tog, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, k8;
Row 25: k20,YO, k3tog, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, k8;
Row 27: k19,YO, k3tog, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, k8;
Row 29: k18,YO, k3tog, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, 4/4 LC;
Row 31: k17,YO, k3tog, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, k8;
Row 33: k16,YO, k3tog, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, k8;
Row 35: k15,YO, k3tog, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, k8;
Row 37: k14,YO, k3tog, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, 4/4 LC;
Row 39: k13,YO, k3tog, (YO, k2tog) 2 times, k8;
Row 40: p to last three stitches, k last 3 stitches;

cable twist border chart

cable-2Bchart-2Bsymbols

cable and lace knit borderCheck out also additional tutorial for knitting corners with this cable trim edging.

Now, if you’re already knitting edgings and borders then look at my “Diamond of the Island” lace edging too. You may like it.

 

Happy knitting! And share your work with me in here on comments or on Facebook 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

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7 thoughts on “Knit Cable Edging With Twisted Trim And Lace

  • 21. April 2015 at 16:36
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    I Wonder how you would attach this border at the same time you knit a project. It is amazingly beautiful.

    Reply
    • 21. April 2015 at 17:05
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      I hope I don’t misunderstand your question and try to answer you. You can combine two patterns. Let’s say you’re knitting a scarf with 10 stitches. You’ll cast on your 10 stitches and cast on additional stitches from this pattern. Or you can knit the edging separately and then sew it on to your project. Sometimes I don’t like to sew and then I’ll attach the edging on the project as I knit, but it requires a picture tutorial, I think. Did this make any sense?

      Reply
      • 22. April 2015 at 02:54
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        Yes, it made sense. Thank you so much.

        Reply
  • 23. April 2015 at 16:07
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    If you knit this as a sew on later edge, how would the corners be worked?

    Reply
    • 23. April 2015 at 16:38
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      I think it is a very good question. I haven’t done it myself yet, but I think I would use “short row technique” or gather it someway (maybe even overlapping some spots someway). I’m sorry I can’t give you more detailed answer at this point. Maybe I can do more precise blog post on this topic?

      Reply
  • 3. July 2016 at 21:33
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    I am looking for a border, or edging, to be sewn on to a finished baby blanket. I am planning on using the mattress stitch to graft the pieces together. I’m thinking your cable and lace edging will look great with the cabling in the baby blanket. Any suggestions on a better technique to sew the border on? Kitchener stitch instead?

    Reply
    • 4. July 2016 at 14:11
      Permalink

      I had to think here 🙂 I just sew without knowing how it’s called. Check this link and let me know if it helps: http://www.learn2knit.co.uk/knitting/joining.php It shows different ways to seam.

      Edit: I don’t think there is right or wrong way – try one and if you don’t like it then try another 🙂

      Reply

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